Is there a special term for a blank coin, before the image is struck?

Planchets ready for minting

Definition: planchet is a prepared disc-shaped metal blank onto which the devices of a coin image are struck or pressed. The metal disc is called a blank until the time it passes through the upsetting machine which causes the rim to be raised. Once it has a rim, the disc is called a planchet.

The phases of a coins beginnings!

When referring to ancient coins, and coins which were made from cast metal discs rather than machined metal discs, the generally preferred term is flan.

 

There are really no hard and fast rules about the usage of these terms in ancient coin collecting, and you will sometimes hear ancient coin blanks referred to as “planchets”, even though they were made from cast metal.    In modern machine-made coinage, the distinction is very clear: the disk is a stamped metal “blank” before getting the rim, and a “planchet” afterwards. A coin that is ready to be stamped is a “Blank” or a “Slug” – From What is a Planchet? from About.com


When the coin is struck improperly, and gets into circulation – the resulting coin is usually prized by collectors as a Mint Error,  and may be very valuable.
Example of Mint error – US cent struck off-center.
Whenever you empty your pockets, check your change – you never know what riches are passing through your pockets!
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